Our decision to focus a network meeting on climate chaos and its impact on water was prompted by the release of the province’s strategic climate risk assessment:
https://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/environment/climate-change/adaptation/risk-assessment

We want to create the time and space to explore climate action related to water, while also aligning our strategies of climate justice to the broader scope and scale of Secwepemc food sovereignty. We are grateful to have Dawn Morrison, Joanne Taylor, and Ananda Lee Tan joining us for this critical and timely discussion (and action!).

Dawn Morrison
Founder/Curator of the Working Group on Indigenous Food Sovereignty

Dawn is of Secwepemc ancestry and is the Founder/Curator of the Working Group on Indigenous Food Sovereignty. Since 1983, Dawn has worked and studied horticulture, ethno-botany, adult education, and restoration of natural systems in formal institutions as well as through her own personal healing and learning journey. Following the years she spent teaching Aboriginal Adult Basic Education, Dawn has been dedicating her time and energy to land based healing and learning which led her to her life’s work of realizing herself more fully as a developing spirit aligned leader in the Indigenous food sovereignty movement. Dawn has consistently organized and held the space over the last 13 years for decolonizing food systems discourse in community, regional and international networks and has become internationally recognized as a published author. Dawn’s work on the Decolonizing Research and Relationships is focused on creating a critical pathway of consciousness, that shines a light on the cross-cultural interface where Indigenous Food Sovereignty meets, social justice, climate change and food systems research, action and adaptive policy, planning and governance. Some of the projects Dawn is curating include: Wild Salmon Caravan, Indigenous Food and Freedom School, and Dismantling Structural Racism in the Food System.


Joanne Taylor
Post Doctoral Research Fellow in Agricultural Climate Change

Adaptation and Policy @ UBCO

Dr. Joanne Taylor is an environmental anthropologist and political ecologist. Funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Dr. Taylor’s doctoral research investigates food security and food sovereignty in the Creston Valley of British Columbia during the renegotiation of the bilateral Columbia River Treaty.  Joanne is currently a SSHRC Post Doctoral Fellow at The University of British Columbia where she is conducting research in agricultural adaptation to climate change in the Cariboo and Okanagan Regions of B.C.  She continues to explore the effects of climate change on food systems while also analysing the effects of industrial agriculture on climate change.